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(Diane Turnshek is still doing the Allegheny Observatory talk this Friday. Reservations needed: 412-321-2400).

De-Light Pittsburgh

Special Public Astronomy Seminar: Diane Turnshek (Physics, CMU)

New date: Thursday, March 5, 2015 7:00 pm

102 Thaw Hall, 3943 O’Hara Street, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15260

De-Light Pittsburgh is a year-long initiative designed to inspire a city-wide focus on energy efficiency while encouraging energy consciousness and ecological conservation to citizens. This innovative program will kick-off during the internationally-recognized Earth Hour 2015. Downtown and Oakland property owners and managers are encouraged to dim or turn off rooftop signage and other non-essential lighting for one hour on Saturday, March 28th from 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m..

Abstract:
2015 is the International Year of Light and, by turning them off, we hope to bring attention to climate change issues, educate the public about the dangers of over-lighting, show off the wonders of the heavens and change the public’s perception that brighter is always better. See how scientists are using art as a vehicle for social change in the battle against light pollution. Come, help celebrate the dark.

Bio:
Diane Turnshek stacks careers. She’s a part-time instructor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh and a special faculty member in the Department of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University. She’s also taught at seven other local institutions of higher learning. She publishes hard science fiction stories about colonizing other worlds and first contact with aliens and, in 2012, spent weeks on Mars (the Mars Desert Research Station in the high Utah desert).

Free and open to the public. The room is handicapped-accessible with prior notification; call 412-624-9000. Sponsored by Allegheny Observatory.

De-Light Pittsburgh

https://www.go-gba.org/event/earth-hour-2015-de-light-pittsburgh-kickoff-celebration/

Check back and check AAAP’s Facebook Page for more Earth Hour Programming.

M106 M106 is a spiral galaxy in the northern constellation Canes Venatici the Hunting Dogs. It lies some 25 million light-years from Earth. Some astronomers think emissions from M106 indicate a vast quantity of material is falling into a supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s core. (5.2-inch Thomas M. Back TMB 130 refractor, Apogee U8300 CCD camera, Hydrogen-alpha/LRGB image with exposures of 6, 7 2, 2, and 2 hours, respectively) Bill Snyder from Connellsville, Pennsylvania

M106
M106 is a spiral galaxy in the northern constellation Canes Venatici the Hunting Dogs. It lies some 25 million light-years from Earth. Some astronomers think emissions from M106 indicate a vast quantity of material is falling into a supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s core. (5.2-inch Thomas M. Back TMB 130 refractor, Apogee U8300 CCD camera, Hydrogen-alpha/LRGB image with exposures of 6, 7 2, 2, and 2 hours, respectively)
Bill Snyder from Connellsville, Pennsylvania

Mr. Bill Snyder, besides winning this Astronomy Magazine Picture of the Day, was recently recognized for the December 24, 2014 NASA APOD, http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141224.html . He was previously recognized for The Astronomy Magazine Picture of the Day, December 12, 2014 for his image of the fish Head Nebula. Mr. Synder has won many APOD’s (~7 or 8) and many Astronomy Magazine Pictures of the Day. Bill is the reigning 2014 International Astrophotographer of the Year in the Deep Space Category http://www.rmg.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year/2014-winners/deep-space . His work may be viewed on his website www.billsnyderastrophotography.com .

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The feature presentation of the February 13, 2015 monthly meeting is the annual planetarium show, Stars Over Pittsburgh. Members should convene at the Bayer Science Stage promptly at 7:30 pm, before heading up as a group to the Planetarium. Please do not go directly to the planetarium entrance. Save $2.00 off the $5.00 fee parking by presenting the parking voucher included in the February Guide Star newsletter. In case of an inclement weather cancellation, it will be reported on the website, in a special Guide Star supplement, on the AAAP listserver and on the club’s Facebook page.

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A photo-montage of the 2014 AAAP Award winners

Our Association succeeds thanks to the involvement of our members – whether it is devoting time to our events (star parties, Astronomy weekends, etc.), or simply participating in our events (meetings, lectures, members-only events, etc.) Whatever the level of involvement, we appreciate all of our members.

The December meeting/party is our opportunity to recognize those members who deserve a special recognition. It is with great pleasure to announce those members who received an award for 2014.

  • The Nova Award honors the new member who has been actively involved with the Association. This year’s recipients were Michael Christeson, Heather Panek, Sally Swieck, and John Wenskovitch. All four winners are active at our public star parties, helping the visitors to enjoy the wonders of the night sky. Heather was also recognized for her expertise with web-based databases to help program our future online membership management system.
  • The George Lindbloom Award honors the male member who has made an extraordinary contribution. This year’s recipients were Nathan Brandt, Michael Skowvron, and William Yorkshire. Nate and Michael were instrumental in getting the new website created and online. It was a monumental task (and still ongoing!), so they deserve a big thanks. Wagman Observatory has seen a number of major improvements this year, and for spearheading all of that work, we thank Bill for all of his time and effort.
  • The Lois Harrison Award honors the female member who has made an extraordinary contribution. This year’s recipients were Kathy DeSantis and Joanne Trees. Both ladies are “ambassadors to the public” by helping out with public outreach.
  • The John A. Brashear Award honors the member who has made a substantial and sustained contribution to our Association. As such, it is only awarded occasionally. We were pleased to present our highest award to Richard Haddad. Not only was the Mingo Creek Park Observatory Dick’s brain-child, he has been involved in all stages of the fund raising, meetings with officials, and continuing to look for ways to help visitors enjoy and understand what they see through our telescopes.

John Holtz, President

The Fish Head Nebula (IC 1795) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia the Queen.

Note: Prior to Mr. Bill Snyder being recognized for the December 24, 2014 NASA APOD, http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141224.html, he was previously recognized for The Astronomy Magazine Picture of the Day, December 12, 2014 for his image of the fish Head Nebula. Mr. Synder has won many APOD’s (~7 or 8) and many Astronomy Magazine Pictures of the Day. This year Bill’s best was to be awarded 2014 International Astrophotographer of the Year in the Deep Space Category. http://www.rmg.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year/2014-winners/deep-space

The Fish Head Nebula (IC 1795) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia the Queen.