Pittsburghers who can find a clear horizon will see a brief view of the Partial Eclipse of the Sun when it begins at 5:47 PM, 249 degrees West, at 6.5 degrees above the horizon when the Moon Shadow touches the Sun’s edge.

Click on the screen captures below: (Stellarum,org)  5:52 PM looking west with Sun at  6.04 degrees elevation and a graphic (TimeandDate.com) of eclipse progress at 5:52 PM. It may take moments after clicking for the images to focus and the text to be readable.

Follow AAAP www.3ap.org and Like AAAP on Facebook for more updates and possible viewing suggestions. Remember NEVER look directly at the Sun, serious permanent eye damage could result.

Wagman Observatory has a good western horizon and is planning to open at 5:30 PM. Call Wagman Observatory for more details. (Wagman Observatory: Address: 225 Kurn Rd, Tarentum, PA 15084 Phone:(724) 224-2510)

AAAP members may come forward with additonal opportunities for safe viewing.

View this AAAP Facebook post and watch this exciting and educational NASA Solar  Eclipse viewing video: (It may take 30-60 seconds for the image of the post to load.)

There are many sources to find the eclipse information specific to your location, including CalSky:  http://www.calsky.com/cs.cgi , www.TimeandDate.com, the US Naval Observatory http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/index.php , etc.

 

MingoOctober23,2014W5,52PMgraphicStellariumOct23 552

Celebrate the sky with the AAAP at the Mingo Observatory’s last regular star party of 2014, 6:30 PM, Saturday, October 25, 2014.

More information, times and directions: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=56006

Looking Southwest just before Sunset, Mars, Moon, Saturn and Sun in that order from left to right. After the Sun sets, followed by the Moon setting Asteroids Ceres and Vesta appear as the sky darkens. Ceres, closer to the Moon, leaves Vesta (Magnitude 7.27) the better target of the two.  That is only the beginning of the night’s sky offerings. Marvel at the wonders of the universe using the telescopes inside AAAP’s Mingo Observatory and the member telescopes stationed outside. See the screenshots of www.Stellarium.org sky simulation. Planetarium programs include sky shows and lecture on spectroscopy in astronomy.

Stellarium Oct26 7,30PM.

 

Mingo https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=56006

Click on the links for specific star party information including driving directions.

 

 

Mingo Clear Sky Chart.

 

 

Old Famers Almanac http://www.almanac.com/astronomy/rise/PA/Pittsburgh/2014-10-25

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Body Dawn
Breaks
Rises Sets Dark
Descends
Day
Length
Sun 6:11 A.M. 7:42 A.M. 6:25 P.M. 7:56 P.M. 10:42
Moon 9:19 A.M. 7:48 P.M.
Mercury 6:24 A.M. 5:51 P.M.
Venus 7:42 A.M. 6:29 P.M.
Mars 12:31 P.M. 9:32 P.M.
Jupiter 1:37 A.M. 3:30 P.M.
Saturn 9:25 A.M. 7:32 P.M.
Uranus 5:36 P.M. 6:16 A.M.
Neptune 4:05 P.M. 3:01 A.M.
Pluto 1:04 P.M. 10:43 P.M.

All times are Eastern Daylight Time at sea level.

“Dawn Breaks” and “Darkness Descends” values are based on astronomical twilight (not civil twilight).

 

We are watching some rather large sunspots.  Check back for information on possible sunspot viewing at the 10/25 Mingo Star Party.  Meanwhile, please enjoy this post shared by Pittsburgh Space Weather.  It features sunspot(s) photograph by AAAP’s Matt Jones:

As skies darken bright planets Mars and Saturn appear. After the Sun sets see the dark sky yield views of “hard to spot” objects, followed by the stunning sight of Moonrise. AAAP opens both Wagman and Mingo Observatories to the public Saturday October 11, 2014 for  Moonrise Star Parties. .Observe the autumn skies and watch the Gibbous Moon rise at 9:14 PM, EDT. Marvel at the wonders of the universe using the telescopes inside AAAP observatories and the member telescopes stationed outside. See the two screenshots of   www.Stellarium.org sky simulations. The first is a 7:30 PM and the second, showing the Gibbous Moon is at 10 PM.

October 11, 2014, SW at 7:30 PM, bright planets Saturn and Mars above the horizon.

October 11, 2014, SW at 7:30 PM, bright planets Saturn and Mars above the horizon.

October 11, 2014,, NE at 10 PM, 45 minutes after Moonrise, See bright starts Aldebaron and Capella,

 

Wagman https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=55966

Mingo https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=56007

Click on the links for specific star party information including driving directions and on the  images above for Stelarium simulations of the sky: 1. SW at 7:30 PM, bright planets Saturn and Mars above the horizon. 2. NE at 10 PM, 45 minutes after Moonrise, See bright starts Aldebaron and Capella,

AAAP star parties at both Wagman Observatory and at Mingo Observatory on Satuday September 27,2014. Public is invited.

StellariumSWSept27at8PM

Stellarium.org screen capture, looking SW at 8PM: Bright star Antares, Mars, Saturn and the Moon form an interesting grouping. Above and to the right Antares shines.

More AAAP September 27, 2014 Star Party information:
Wagman Observatory
Mingo Observatory

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Bill Snyder’s astrophotograph of the Horsehead Nebula (IC 434) is the First Place Winner in the Deep Space Category at the 2014 International Astrophotographer of the Year Contest sponsored by the Royal Museums Greenwich. Bill has received many accolades for his astrophotography, including seven APOD (Astronomy Picture of the Day) wins. Bill’s astrophotographs can be viewed and purchased at his website http://billsnyderastrophotography.com/ and at shows across the East Coast and Eastern Mid-West. Congratulations to Bill Snyder, from the AAAP!

Timeline of the Universe
Mingo Observatory Lecture: The Big Bang and Then Some – a Layman’s Perspective
Learn about how everything we now enjoy in the night sky got started.
Open Rain or shine, cloudy or clear. No reservation needed.
Four Tuesdays, 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM, September 9th, 16th, 23rd, and 30th.
Observing afterwards, conditions permitting.
Mingo Clear Sky Chart

Wagman Clear Sky Chart
Tuesday, October 14, 2014 Wagman Better Observing Techniques(formerly Starhopping) class is cancelled.
Monday, September 15, 2014 Wagman Better Observing Techniques(formerly Starhopping) class is cancelled, by Wagman Director Tom Reiland due to deteriorating conditions. 3:45PM 9/15/2014 Tuesday’s session September 16 is still scheduled.
Better Observing Techniques classes are scheduled Mondays and Tuesdays, Sept 15 and 16 and Oct 13 and 14 at Wagman Observatory. Classes begin at 7 PM.

Wagman_sunset

9/6/2014 – Sunset at Wagman Observatory – By Nate Brandt

It rained part of the way to Wagman as I drove east last night which probably discouraged more people from coming out for movie night.  We had a beautiful sunset in the west and at the same time we had a double rainbow in the east followed up by the movie October Sky shortly after.

Double Rainbow over Wagman Movie Night - By Nate Brandt

Double Rainbow over Wagman Movie Night – By Nate Brandt

Regards,

Nate Brandt