Please join the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh on Friday and Saturday, July 24 and 25, 2015 at the Wagman Observatory and the Mingo Observatory as we open our buildings and grounds to the the public for July Star Parties. Please check here for updates as announced. Events are conditions permitting.

Share our enthusiasm for astronomy and the recent New Horizons Mission to Pluto and its moon Charon.

Stellarium Scieen Capture of July 24, 9:30 PM looking south with the moon and Saturn in Libra.

July 24, 2015 9 PM  looking west Venus and Jupiter are setting.  First Quarter Moon, 8 days old, is in the upper left just below Saturn.

July 24, 2015 9 PM looking west Venus and Jupiter are setting. First Quarter Moon, 8 days old, is in the upper left just below Saturn.

 

Stellarium Scieen Capture of July 24, 9:30 PM looking south with the moon and Saturn in Libra.

 

Wagman Observatory

The Star Parties start Friday, July 24 and Saturday, July 25 at 8:40 PM EDT at the Nicholas E. Wagman Observatory in Deer Lakes Regional Park, Frazer Township, Pa., near the village of Russellton in northeastern Allegheny County and some 18 miles from Pittsburgh.

This is an opportunity for amateur astronomers, students and the general public to observe the wonders of the summer sky along with Saturn, Venus and Jupiter. Visitors will be able to observe the Moon one day after First Quarter, the Hercules cluster and the Ring Nebula.

 

Tom Reiland

Wagman Director

 

Mingo Observatory

Solar Obeserving (weather permitting)  at 5:30 p.m. Planetarium Shows (rain or shine) beginning at 7:00 p.m.Celestial Observing (weather permitting) beginning at DuskMingo Creek Park Observatory is Open Rain or shine, cloudy or clear!Planetarium Schedule: 7:00 PM: Sky Show, 8:00 PM: Program TBA  9:00 PM: Sky Show, 10:00 PM: Program TBA SAFELY View the Sun early with our 4″ Lunt Solar Telescope and then see wonders of the night sky through our 24 inch Ritchey-Chretien Reflector and 10 inch Refractor telescopes.

Observe Double-stars, planetary nebulae, astonishing star clusters, distant galaxies. The Planets Saturn and its rings, Jupiter and its Galilean moons, Venus and more starting at dusk (sky conditions permitting! ).

Call 724-348-6150

GPS coordinates are Lat 40*:12′:42″ Long 80*:01′:14″

 

Students, scouts, youth groups, adults, and children accompanied by adults are welcome. If you know others who would be interested in receiving these notices, please respond to this email to send their email addresses.

Mingo Creek Park Observatory is Handicap Accessible.

Also save the date for our 10th Anniversary next month during our August 14th & 15th Star parties.

 

We hope to see you there!

 

 

Nick Martch

Director

Mingo Creek Park Observatory

Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh

 

New Horizons has arrived at the Pluto system.  The unmanned NASA spacecraft New Horizons will flyby Pluto  7:49 am ET on Tuesday, July 14, 2015.
There is live NASA TV coverage.   http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-tv-on-ustream/#.VaRNlM-Sp7s
There will be updates for AAAP Members on the private Yahoo User Group and for members and public on the Facebook Page:

Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh on Facebook.

 

Link for NASA Ustream Live Coverage:
http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-tv-on-ustream/#.VaRNlM-Sp7s

 

 

Additional Pluto Flyby Information:

 

Courtesy of Anita Sohus of the NASA Museum Alliance, FYI…

 

Timing dependent on what happens during downlinks with the Deep Space Network, hence subject to change.

 

Jimmy Lee from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center provided the attached sheet. Below are the details:

 

  • On approach, LORRItakes critical optical navigation images to confirm the spacecraft is on the right course for the flyby.  The team can use these data to adjust timing of the observation sequence as late as July 12.
  • Final radio transmission prior to closest approach is received at ~11:15pm EDT on July 13.
  • During the flyby on July 14, LORRIwill take high-resolution B/W images, Ralph / MVIC will make color maps, and Ralph / LEISA will image the system in the infrared, all of which will help determine the geology and composition of the surface.
  • Closest approach to Pluto is at 7:49:57 a.m. EDTon July 14.
  • Approximately one hour after closest approach, at 8:51am EDT on July 14, the spacecraft will turn around and, with Pluto between it and the Sun, Alicewill make ultraviolet measurements to determine the composition of the atmosphere.
  • When Pluto is between the spacecraft and Earth, REXwill receive transmissions from the Deep Space Network (DSN) to determine the pressure and temperature of the atmosphere.
  • The spacecraft will orient toward Earth and make its first transmission after the closest approach at approximately 4:30 pm EDT, which arrives at earth at approximately 9:00 pm EDT.
  • Throughout the flyby, SWAPand PEPSSI will characterize the energetic particle environment, and SDC will search for dust in the Pluto system.

 

IMAGES expected to be AVAILABLE

JULY 13:         B/W images of Pluto and Charon at 15 km/pixel and 20 km/pixel (LORRI)

JULY 14:         Color image of Pluto and Charon at 28 km/pixel (Ralph/MVIC)

Color image of Charon at 7 km/pixel (Ralph/MVIC)

B/W full-frame image of Pluto at 4 km/pixel (LORRI)

 

Instruments: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Mission/Spacecraft/Payload.php

Alice – ultraviolet imaging spectrometer

LORRI – LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager

PEPSSI – Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation

Ralph – multispectral and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging instrument

Ralph/LEISA – Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array

Ralph/MVIC – Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera

REX – Radio science EXperiment

SWAP – Solar Wind Around Pluto

SDC – Student Dust Counter

 

 

Like and Follow AAAP on Facebook.

 

Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh on Facebook.

The Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh and the Kiski Astronomers once again bring this popular family program to Moraine State Park, Portersville, PA, July 11, 2015. July 18, raindate. Experience a guided tour of the sky! Meet at the parking lot near the Bike Rental on North Shore, Moraine State Park. Bring a lawn chair, bug spray, and your curiosity. Please no smoking anywhere on the field (it harms the telescopes) and refrain from using flash lights or cell phones. The white light ruins night vision.
Among other distant objects see Jupiter and Venus extremely close near the constellation Leo and Saturn with its glorious rings between Scorpius and Libra. Be astonished to see a coat hanger in the sky near Albireo – two stars, one blue and one gold with one name. Rain date July 18 (call park office 724 368-8811 by 4:00 pm or check our facebook if weather looks bad) This is a FREE event. From the Moraine Facebook Page.  Follow updates here and on AAAP’s Facebook Page. Get Directions to Moraine Star Party. Check the Weather Forecast for Moraine Star Party and Clear Sky Chart . Moraine State Park map.

 

Below Stellarium Screen Capture reaveals Saturday’s western horizon.

 

 

 

July 11, 2015

Sunspot 2371

Sunspot 2371

Update:

Wednesday

Aurora Possible Wednesday evening:

The coronal mass ejection that erupted June 22 in conjunction with the R2 solar flare has been modeled and arrival is expected June 24 at 2300 UT

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

If you experienced electrial interruption Tuesday it might have been Sunspot AR2371 . AR2371 has a ‘beta-gamma-delta’ magnetic field that harbors energy for X-class solar flares. June 22 and 23 there have been highly energetic Coronal Mass Ejections (CME’s) spewing particles and energy outward.

The effects can include power outages, radio and cell phone disruptions, and aurora.

Sunspots, areas of increased turbulence, appear as dark areas on the surface of the Sun because the material cools as the gases are whipped away from the Sun’s surface. A sunspot is related to a CME or Coronal Mass Ejection in that Sunspots often produce CME’s, which involve the ejection of highly energetic material away from the Sun’s surface.  Some CME’s occur independent of sunspots.

Never look directly at the Sun and worse never point a telescope or binoculars at the Sun. Permanent eye damage can result from looking at the sun even once. There are special filters that allow safe solar viewing when used properly.  Both Wagman and Mingo Observatories have telescopes especially equipped for solar observing and offer public observing of the sun prior to regularly scheduled star parties conditions permitting,

This active sunspot, an “Active Region” (AR), called AR2371 and it has produced powerful CME’s in the last two days making it a possibility for the Pittsburgh Area to see aurora.

To optimize your chances of seeing aurora,  find a dark location.  Look north, in the area of the North Star (Polaris), the last star in the handle of the Little Dipper.  Use the Pointer Stars in the Big Dipper to find Polaris. Give your eyes a chance to adjust to the darkness and look for light in the Northern Sky. It may be colored or not.  Often it is green. Often waiting until after the 11PM news concludes and folks turn out the household lights darkens the sky yields better results.

Good Luck!

Keep up to date with more information on the  AAAP Facebook Page  and visit AAAP’s July 24 and 25 Star Parties, at Wagman and Mingo Observatories..  AAAP Monthly Meeting s resume in September.

Sunspot AR2371

 

Joint USAF/NOAA Solar Geophysical Activity Report and Forecast SDF Number 172 Issued at 2200Z on 22 Jun 2015

Joint USAF/NOAA Solar Geophysical Activity Report and Forecast
SDF Number 172 Issued at 2200Z on 22 Jun 2015

 

 

 

Jaw-dropping near conjunction of Jupiter and Venus in June, espceially in late June and into early July.  June 30 and July 1 it will be especially dramatic.

Come out to the Wagman Star Parties and the Mingo Star Parties June 20 and June 21 to see the King and Queen of Planets in the gathering darkness from AAAP’s observtory hills.  Stay as the sky darkens and more stars come out and enjoy views through the observatory telecsopes and through member telecsopes. For more information on the weekend star parties : Wagman and Mingo June 20 and 21, 2015 Star Parties Meanwhile, and into early July, step outside  in gathering dusk , look west and see one of nature’s spectacular sky shows!

 

 

Jupiter and Venus, 3 Degree Conjunction, July 1, 2015, Stellarium Screen Capture

Jupiter and Venus, 3 Degree Conjunction, July 1, 2015, Stellarium Screen Capture

“At present, the planets Venus and Jupiter are both heading eastward (upward) along the ecliptic, toward the star Regulus. You might think Jupiter should get to Regulus first, since the king planet lodges so much closer to Regulus, the only 1st-magnitude star to sit almost squarely on the ecliptic. However, the closer that a planet resides to the sun, the faster that the planet travels in its smaller orbit. Venus, the second planet outward from the sun, races along at 35 kilometers per second whereas Jupiter, the fifth planet outward, plods along at 13 kilometers per second.

But that’s not all. Jupiter’s orbital path is a solid seven times longer than that traveled by Venus. For that reason, Venus will zoom toward Regulus day by day, whereas Jupiter will travel at a snail’s pace.”  From Bruce McClure, Earth-Sky Tonight

 

 

Please join the Amateur Astreonomers Association of Pittsburgh on Friday and Saturday, June 19 and 20, 2015 at the Wagman Observatory and the Mingo Observatory as we open our buildings and grounds to the the public for June Star Parties. Please check here for updates as announced. Events are conditions permitting.

Note from Wagman Observatory, 4PM, Friday June 19, 2015:

Tonight’s Star Party at Wagman Observatory is cancelled.  Cloud cover goes all the way back to Illinois and radar shows rain moving this way through Indiana and Ohio.  I’ll wait until tomorrow to decide what to do for that SP.
 
Tom

Note:  Mingo Observatory will be in operation using the Haddad Planetarium regardless of the cloud cover.  However, if attendance is lacking the facility may close earlier.  Mingo Phone:  724-348-6150 .

Planets Jupiter and Venus will be at close conjunction. Don’t miss the jaw dropiing encouter through late June and early July. More information:Jaw-dropping Jupiter – Venus Encounter

9:30 PM the Western sky will reveal planets Jupiter and Venus above the setting Moon, all in Cancer. The Moon itself 3 or 4 nights after New Moon,  will be but a slim cresent, with 12 % illumination. To the South, Saturn will hang low in the sky, in Libra.  Stellarium screen capture.

Stellarium61915930PM SW

 

Wagman Observatory

225 Kurn Road Tarentum, PA 15084 ~ 724-224-2510 ~ Latitude 40.627 degrees Longitude -79.813 degrees

Wagman Star Parties start Friday, June 19 and Saturday, June 20 at 8:55 p.m. at the Nicholas E. Wagman Observatory in Deer Lakes Regional Park, Frazer Township, Pa., near the village of Russellton in northeastern Allegheny County and some 18 miles from Pittsburgh.

Wagman Observatory ISS an Iridium Flare Times as they become available: http://www.heavens-above.com/?lat=40.626&lng=-79.82925&alt=100&loc=Nicholas+E.+Wagman+Observatory&TZ=EST

No ISS Visible Pass for Wagman on Friday. one on Saturday at 21:58:54/

ISS – Visible Passes
20 Jun -1.3 21:54:01 10° W 21:56:30 20° SW 21:58:54 10° S visible

 

Wagman Observatory Iridium Flares for June 19 and 20, 2015, including morning and evening flares.
Jun 19, 03:01:18 -7.8 39° 146° (SSE) Iridium 54 2 km (W) -7.9 -22°
Jun 19, 04:38:29 -1.3 29° 103° (ESE) Iridium 77 49 km (W) -7.0 -11°
Jun 19, 21:35:22 -5.6 18° 342° (NNW) Iridium 47 9 km (W) -5.8 -7°
Jun 19, 22:36:10 0.2 11° 285° (WNW) Iridium 76 237 km (E) -5.5 -15°
Jun 19, 23:42:55 -4.6 30° 239° (WSW) Iridium 60 15 km (W) -7.4 -22°
Jun 20, 02:55:12 -3.4 39° 148° (SSE) Iridium 83 15 km (E) -7.9 -22°
Jun 20, 04:32:22 -3.4 28° 104° (ESE) Iridium 82 24 km (E) -6.9 -12°
Jun 20, 21:29:07 -5.2 19° 342° (NNW) Iridium 11 11 km (W) -5.9 -6°
Jun 20, 23:36:53 -7.2 31° 240° (WSW) Iridium 45 10 km (E) -7.4 -22°

Mingo Observatory

1 Shelter 10 Road Finleyville, PA 15332 ~ 724-348-6150 ~  This address does not lend to mapping.  Please use the GPS Coordinates. GPS coordinates are Latitude 40*:12′:42″ Longitude 80*:01′:14″ or Latitude 40.211degrees, Longitude -80.020 degrees. Declination -9 degrees.  For directions and information about the Mingo Observatory visit:  https://wp.me/P46Qqk-18 .

Mingo Observatory will open Friday, June 19 and Saturday, June 20  for solar viewing and evening star party.  View the Sun early with our 4″ Lunt Solar Telescope and then see wonders of the night sky through our 24 inch Ritchey-Chretien Reflector and 10 inch Refractor telescopes, sky conditions permitting.

Friday, June 19 and Saturday, June 20, 2015 Mingo Observatory will open at 5:30 PM for Solar Observing and at 7:00 PM for viewing  the Evening Sky. Open Rain or shine, cloudy or clear! 

Planetarium Schedule: 7:00 PM: Sky Show, 8:00 PM: Program: How Astronomers Determine Time,  Ken Kobus 9:00 PM: Sky Show, 10:00 PM: Program How Astronomers Determine Time, Ken Kobus.

Mingo Observatory ISS an Iridium Flare Times as they become available:  http://www.heavens-above.com/?lat=40.211&lng=-80.019&loc=Mingo+Creek+Park+Observatory&alt=0&tz=EST

ISS – Visible Passes
Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
19 Jun -0.7 22:49:08 10° WSW 22:49:54 11° SW 22:50:25 10° SW visible
20 Jun -1.4 21:54:00 10° W 21:56:33 21° SW 21:59:02 10° S visible

 

Mingo  Observatory Iridium Flares for June 19 and 20, 2015, including morning and evening flares.
http://www.heavens-above.com/IridiumFlares.aspx?lat=40.211&lng=-80.019&loc=Mingo+Creek+Park+Observatory&alt=0&tz=EST
Jun 19, 03:01:08 -4.2 38° 146° (SE) Iridium 54 12 km (E) -7.8 -22° 
Jun 19, 04:38:20 -2.7 29° 103° (ESE) Iridium 77 33 km (W) -6.9 -12° 
Jun 19, 21:35:15 -5.8 18° 342° (NNW) Iridium 47 2 km (W) -5.8 -7° 
Jun 19, 22:36:01 0.4 11° 284° (WNW) Iridium 76 255 km (E) -5.5 -16° 
Jun 19, 23:42:47 -7.3 30° 239° (WSW) Iridium 60 5 km (E) -7.4 -22° 
Jun 20, 04:32:13 -1.8 27° 104° (ESE) Iridium 82 41 km (E) -6.9 -12° 
Jun 20, 21:29:00 -5.8 19° 342° (NNW) Iridium 11 4 km (W) -5.9 -6° 
Jun 20, 23:36:45 -3.0 31° 239° (WSW) Iridium 45 30 km (E) -7.4 -22° 
Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
19 Jun ? 21:24:30 10° WSW 21:27:04 38° SSE 21:29:38 10° E visible
19 Jun ? 22:59:46 10° W 23:01:13 26° WSW 23:01:13 26° WSW visible
20 Jun ? 21:37:37 10° WSW 21:40:16 50° S 21:42:55 10° E visible
20 Jun ? 23:13:04 10° W 23:13:48 16° WSW 23:13:48 16° WSW visible

 

Stars  “come out”  after sunlight fades from view.  The sun does not set this weekend until approximately 8:53 PM and darkness does not descend until approximately one hour later.   Please use parking lights only  when you drive through the Wagman gate or pass Shelter 10 approaching Mingo Observatory. Drive very slowly and cautiously. There is no  alcohol or tobacco permitted on  our  observatory grounds. We suggest you bring bottled water.  There is no running water on either site. There are park style restroom facilities. Dress warmly as springtime nights can be quite chilly afer the sun goes down.

The summer solstice comes on June 21, 2015 at 16:38 UTC. For North American time zones, that places the solstice at 12:38 p.m. EDT, June 21, 2015, make these June Star Parties the final nights of Spring. The solstice  brings the northernmost sun for the year, as seen from around the globe.

 

Rise &  Set Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for 2015-06-19

http://www.almanac.com/astronomy/rise/PA/Pittsburgh/2015-06-19

Body Dawn
Breaks
Rises Sets Dark
Descends
Day
Length
Sun 3:44 A.M. 5:49 A.M. 8:53 P.M. 10:58 P.M. 15:03
Moon 8:56 A.M. 11:03 P.M.
Mercury 4:48 A.M. 6:58 P.M.
Venus 9:22 A.M. 11:42 P.M.
Mars 5:43 A.M. 8:48 P.M.
Jupiter 10:00 A.M. 11:56 P.M.
Saturn 6:22 P.M. 4:22 A.M.
Uranus 2:18 A.M. 3:12 P.M.
Neptune 12:45 A.M. 11:50 A.M.
Pluto 9:42 P.M. 7:22 A.M.

All times are Eastern Daylight Time at sea level.

“Dawn Breaks” and “Darkness Descends” values are based on astronomical twilight (not civil twilight).

Rise &  Set Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for 2015-06-2o

http://www.almanac.com/astronomy/rise/PA/Pittsburgh/2015-06-20

Body Dawn
Breaks
Rises Sets Dark
Descends
Day
Length
Sun 3:44 A.M. 5:49 A.M. 8:53 P.M. 10:58 P.M. 15:03
Moon 9:54 A.M. 11:38 P.M.
Mercury 4:45 A.M. 6:57 P.M.
Venus 9:23 A.M. 11:40 P.M.
Mars 5:42 A.M. 8:47 P.M.
Jupiter 9:57 A.M. 11:52 P.M.
Saturn 6:17 P.M. 4:18 A.M.
Uranus 2:14 A.M. 3:08 P.M.
Neptune 12:41 A.M. 11:46 A.M.
Pluto 9:38 P.M. 7:18 A.M.  

All times are Eastern Daylight Time at sea level.

“Dawn Breaks” and “Darkness Descends” values are based on astronomical twilight (not civil twilight).

9 PM SW May 23, 2015 Jupiter above the Moon, Venus to the right. Stellarium.org Screen Capture

9 PM SW May 23, 2015 Jupiter above the Moon, Venus to the right. Stellarium.org Screen Capture

The May Wagman Star Parties and the May Mingo Star Parties will be on May 22 and 23, 2015. Arrive early to see the evening planets. Please plan on sticking around for the darkening of the sky when dimmer objects brighten. The  Stellarium screen capture depicts the sky looking west at 9 PM. These star parties  present an opportunity to observe other wonders of the Spring sky such as the galaxies in the Coma-Virgo Cluster, planetary nebulae and star clusters.
Did you get a telescope recently and don’t know how to use it? Bring it along and members of the AAAP will help!
Looking to buy a telescope, accessories, star charts and books? Our star parties are the place to start. We’ll have free handouts, guides and booklets to point visitors in the right direction. Admission is free, though we gladly accept donations to cover the cost of operation.
Stars do not “come out” until after sunlight fades from view.  The sun does not set this weekend until approximately 8:10 PM and darkness does not descend until approximately one hour later.   Please use parking lights only  when you drive through the Wagman gate or pass Shelter 10 approaching Mingo Observatory. Drive very slowly and cautiously.There is no  alcohol or tobacco permitted on  the observatory grounds. We suggest you bring bottled water.  There is no running water on either site. There are park style restroom facilities. Dress warmly as springtime nights can be quite chilly afer the sun goes down.

 

Mingo Observatory

Mingo Creek Park Observatory,1 Shelter 10 Road, Finleyville, PA  15332 Phone 724-348-6150 This address does not lend to mapping.  Please use the GPS Coordinates. GPS coordinates are Latitude 40*:12′:42″ Longitude 80*:01′:14″ or Latitude 40.211degrees, Longitude -80.020 degrees. Declination -9 degrees.  For directions and information about the Mingo Observatory visit<a title=”Mingo Observatory” href=”https://wp.me/P46Qqk-18″ target=”_blank”>  https://wp.me/P46Qqk-18 </a> .

Open Rain or shine, cloudy or clear! Planetarium Schedule: 7:00 PM: Sky Show, 8:00 PM: Program TBA  9:00 PM: Sky Show, 10:00 PM: Program TBA.

View the Sun early with our 4″ Lunt Solar Telescope and then see wonders of the night sky through our 24 inch Ritchey-Chretien Reflector and 10 inch Refractor telescopes, sky conditions permitting.

No ISS Passes to be seen this weekend. ISS is not to return to our night skies until May 30, 2015.

Iridium Flares for Mingo Observatory

None for Friday.  Two for Saturday:

May 24, 22:01:200.911°347° (NNW)Iridium 75138 km (E)-5.4-14°

May 24, 22:50:59-0.711°275° (W)Iridium 66168 km (E)-5.8-20°

 

Wagman Observatory

Wagman Observatory,  225 Kurn Road, Tarentum, PA 15084  Phone 724-224-2510 Latitude 40.627 degrees, Longitude -79.813 degrees

This event is scheduled for Friday and Saturday, May 22 and 23 starting at 8:35 PM EDT. The Nicholas E. Wagman Observatory is located in Deer Lakes Regional Park, Frazer Township, Pa., near the village of Russellton in northeastern Allegheny County and some 18 miles from Pittsburgh. This is an opportunity for amateur astronomers, students and the general public to observe the wonders of the Spring sky such as the galaxies in the Coma-Virgo Cluster, planetary nebulae and star clusters. The Star Parties will be held WEATHER PERMITTING. The public should call 724-224-2510 for more information.

 

 

Rise & Set Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for 2015-05-22

http://www.almanac.com/astronomy/rise/PA/Pittsburgh/2015-05-22

Friday, May 22, 2015

Body Dawn
Breaks
Rises Sets Dark
Descends
Day
Length
Sun 4:01 A.M. 5:57 A.M. 8:36 P.M. 10:32 P.M. 14:39
Moon 10:12 A.M. Next Day
Mercury 6:39 A.M. 9:29 P.M.
Venus 8:52 A.M. 12:09 A.M.
Mars 6:19 A.M. 9:06 P.M.
Jupiter 11:29 A.M. 1:38 A.M.
Saturn 8:21 P.M. 6:19 A.M.
Uranus 4:06 A.M. 4:57 P.M.
Neptune 2:35 A.M. 1:39 P.M.
Pluto 11:35 P.M. 9:15 A.M.

All times are Eastern Daylight Time at sea level.

“Dawn Breaks” and “Darkness Descends” values are based on astronomical twilight (not civil twilight).

AAAP Logo - 0314 x 0314 - photo white on black - rev 2The May 8, 2015 AAAP  monthly meeting will feature Dr. James LoPresto, Phd. presenting “Solar Polar Vortex Studies and What Appears To Be An Upcoming Maunder Minimum”. Currently, he is Professor of Physics/Astronomy at Edinboro University.  The Annual Election of Officers will be held during the business portion of the meeting. More May meeting information appears in the May Guide Star.  Members and Guests should convene at the Bayer Science Stage, Carnegie Science Center, One Allegheny Ave.Pittsburgh, PA 15212  promptly at 7:30 pm. The parking fee is $5 at the inside lobby kiosk. It is recommended to enter and exit through the same gate.

AAAP Logo - 0314 x 0314 - photo white on black - rev 2

The April 10, 2015 monthly meeting will feature, AAAP’s own Dr. Ken Cole’s presentation, “Making A New Atlas of Mars,” a different top-down look at the Red Planet. Here is Ken’s lecture synopsis:
“As long as people have been telling stories, the planet Mars has a been an object of fascination and a key setting, or character, in those stories. In the half century of exploration by robotic spacecraft, the visions of H.G. Wells and Percival Lowell have been replaced with a very different picture of the red planet.” . Members and Guests should convene at the Bayer Science Stage, Carnegie Science Center, One Allegheny Ave.Pittsburgh, PA 15212  promptly at 7:30 pm. The parking fee is $5.