To automatically sync the AAAP Calendar of Events to your personal calendar, please follow the instructions on our Calendar Download page. For lists of other events, check out the AAAP Star Party Schedule, the AAAP Meetings Schedule, the International Astronomy Events, or the Our Pittsburgh Constellation Events pages.

 

2017 General Meetings: Jan 13, Feb 10, Mar 10, Apr 7, May 12

2017 Mingo Star Parties: Apr 21 & 22; May 19 & 20; Jun 23 & 24; Jul 14 & 15; Aug 11 & 12; Sep 15 & 16; Oct 14 & 28; Nov 11

2017 Wagman Star Parties: Mar 31; Apr 1; May 5 & 6; Jun 2 & 3; Jun 30; Jul 1, 28, & 29; Aug 25 & 26; Sep 9 & 23; Oct 7 & 28; Nov 4

 

Please  Note: Alternate views of events (such as calendar view) are available by clicking the drop-down next to the word ‘Agenda’.

Feb
26
Sun
2017
Annular Solar Eclipse
Feb 26 all-day

February 26 – Annular Solar Eclipse. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun. This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon. The Sun’s corona is not visible during an annular eclipse. The path of the eclipse will begin off the coast of Chile and pass through southern Chile and southern Argentina across the southern Atlantic Ocean and into Angola and Congo in Africa. A partial eclipse will be visible throughout parts of southern South America and southwestern Africa.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

New Moon
Feb 26 all-day

February 26 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 14:59 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Mar
10
Fri
2017
AAAP Meeting
Mar 10 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting
Guest speaker and topic: Harsha Blumer, PhD presents “High-Energy Astrophysics: The Fascinating World of Supernova Explosions and Pulsars”

Harsha Blumer, PhD is a post-doctoral researcher at West Virginia University, Morgantown, WVA and Greenbank Observatory. The lecture will take place at the Science Stage in the Carnegie Science Center.

Mar
12
Sun
2017
Full Moon
Mar 12 all-day

March 12 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 14:54 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Worm Moon because this was the time of year when the ground would begin to soften and the earthworms would reappear. This moon has also been known as the Full Crow Moon; the Full Crust Moon; the Full Sap Moon; and the Lenten Moon.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Mar
20
Mon
2017
March Equinox
Mar 20 all-day

March 20 – March Equinox. The March equinox occurs at 10:29 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Mar
25
Sat
2017
Astronomy Weekend
Mar 25 all-day

Astronomy Weekend, Carnegie Science Center
March 25 – 26, 2017
AAAP members will be presenting astronomy to the public again this year at Carnegie Science Center’s March 25-26, 2017 Astronomy Weekend. More information and time to be posted as become available.Generally, AAAP sets up in the lobby(information tables and displays and telescopes outside, weather permitting. Typically Saturday morning and after noon and Sunday morning and early afternoon.
Posted 1/29/2017 KD, AAAP VP, Program Chair

Mar
26
Sun
2017
Astronomy Weekend
Mar 26 all-day

Astronomy Weekend, Carnegie Science Center
March 25 – 26, 2017
AAAP members will be presenting astronomy to the public again this year at Carnegie Science Center’s March 25-26, 2017 Astronomy Weekend. More information and time to be posted as become available.Generally, AAAP sets up in the lobby(information tables and displays and telescopes outside, weather permitting. Typically Saturday morning and after noon and Sunday morning and early afternoon.
Posted 1/29/2017 KD, AAAP VP, Program Chair

Mar
28
Tue
2017
New Moon
Mar 28 all-day

March 28 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 02:58 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Mar
31
Fri
2017
CANCELLED: Wagman Star Party
Mar 31 @ 8:00 pm – Apr 1 @ 12:00 am

***UPDATE: Friday’s Star Party is CANCELLED due to inclement weather***

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties-2/

Apr
1
Sat
2017
Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation
Apr 1 all-day

April 1 – Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 19 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Wagman Star Party
Apr 1 @ 8:00 pm – Apr 2 @ 12:00 am

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties-2/

Apr
7
Fri
2017
Jupiter at Opposition
Apr 7 all-day

April 7 – Jupiter at Opposition. The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons. A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter’s cloud bands. A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter’s four largest moons appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

CANCELLED: North Allegheny McKnight Star Party
Apr 7 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

UPDATE: Star Party has been cancelled due to inclement weather.
Fred Klein
04/05/17

The star party at North Allegheny McKnight elementary school 500 Cumberland Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 is scheduled for Friday April 7. This is scheduled for 6-8PM which is still daylight so please be prepared for that, though there will be a nearly full moon, Mars, and Mercury to show. This coincides with the school science fair so they get a lot of people, especially at the end.

Fred Klein
03/28/17

AAAP Meeting
Apr 7 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting & Annual Officer Nominations
Guest speaker and topic: Chien-Ting Chen, PhD presents “Hunting for Powerful Monsters: Supermassive Black Holes in Distant Galaxies”

Chien-Ting Chen, PhD is an astrophysicist at Pennsylvania State University. The lecture will take place at the Buhl Planetarium Theater of the Carnegie Science Center.

Apr
11
Tue
2017
Full Moon
Apr 11 all-day

April 11 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 06:08 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink or wild ground phlox which is one of the first spring flowers. This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon; the Growing Moon; and the Egg Moon. Many coastal tribes called it the Full Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Apr
21
Fri
2017
Mingo Star Party
Apr 21 @ 6:00 pm – Apr 22 @ 12:00 am

Moonrise: 03:50 | Moonset: 14:45
Sunset: 20:05

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties-2/

Apr
22
Sat
2017
Lyrids Meteor Shower
Apr 22 – Apr 23 all-day

April 22-23 – Lyrids Meteor Shower. The Lyrids is an average shower usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. The crescent moon should not be too much of a problem this year. Skies should still be dark enough for a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2017.html

Mingo Star Party
Apr 22 @ 6:00 pm – Apr 23 @ 12:00 am

Moonrise: 04:26 | Moonset: 15:50
Sunset: 20:06

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties-2/

Kunkle Park Star Party
Apr 22 @ 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Star parties begin at dusk, weather permitting. Kunkle Park is located behind the Washington Township Municipal Building.

Terry Trees
03/29/17

Apr
23
Sun
2017
Mt. Lebanon Earth Day
Apr 23 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

This is a fun day and gives the AAAP a chance to promote Wagman and Mingo Star Parties, club memberships, astronomy, light pollution awareness, and the solar eclipse!

More Info:
http://www.lebogreen.org

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Earth-Day-in-Mt-Lebanon/135088833224133

Kathy DeSantis